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Woman conned out of £113,000 life savings

A woman who was conned out of £113,000 by a romance fraudster says she is facing financial ruin because her banks will not reimburse the money.

Rachel Elwell, 50, from Brownhills in the West Midlands, was contacted by an ‘attractive’ and ‘intelligent’ man on a dating site at the beginning of this year.

She said the stranger, who claimed to live nearby, told her he was working as a contractor in Ukraine.

He sent documents and photos to bolster his story before asking her to send him some money to settle a tax bill which risked derailing his project.

The man later claimed to have been kidnapped after failing to repay Russian loan sharks and begged for more cash to pay off ransom demands.

By the time Ms Elwell realised at the beginning of April that she had fallen victim to an elaborate con, she had transferred nearly £113,000 – burning through almost her entire life savings.

Asked earlier this year about why she made the payments, Ms Elwell told the BBC: ‘When he said to me his life was in danger and I didn’t hear from him, I thought he’d been murdered.

‘Can you imagine feeling you’re responsible for whether someone lives or dies?’

CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED Rachel Elwell) A woman who was conned out of ??113k by an online fraudster says she's facing bankruptcy after claiming her banks ruled they would not reimburse the money she lost. Rachel Elwell became the victim of an elaborate online scam in January this year when she started speaking to a man she believed lived just 25 miles away from her home in Brownhills, West Mids. But the 50-year-old was then scammed into believing the man was kidnapped abroad and within three months he had convinced her to send him more than ??100,000 to save his life. After discovering on April 1 that she was the victim of an online scam, Rachel realised she had lost her life savings and was tens of thousands of pounds in debt. SEE CATERS COPY
Rachel Elwell became the victim of an elaborate online scam in January this year (Picture: Caters News Agency)

She borrowed tens of thousands of pounds by taking out loans and credit cards and sent the money to the fraudster through her banks.

Ms Elwell says she sent £36,425 through Santander between January 22 and February 19. She also sent £62,350 through HSBC, totalling £98,775, she added. Her total losses add up to £112,575.

Her case has been the subject of a three-month investigation from both banks, and she hoped she would be covered by a code of conduct that supports victims of fraud.

But Ms Elwell said she now finds herself ‘in a devastating situation’ after claiming the banks have told her she is not eligible for reimbursement.

She said: ‘The police have said I am a victim of crime but the banks are refusing to treat me like one.

‘The code these banks have created and signed up to says they should support victims of crime, but where is the support?

‘I am going to be left bankrupt and I am being chased every day for money I don’t have.’

CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED Bario had photos of everything he said he was doing. Rachel had no reason not to believe him) A woman who was conned out of ??113k by an online fraudster says she's facing bankruptcy after claiming her banks ruled they would not reimburse the money she lost. Rachel Elwell became the victim of an elaborate online scam in January this year when she started speaking to a man she believed lived just 25 miles away from her home in Brownhills, West Mids. But the 50-year-old was then scammed into believing the man was kidnapped abroad and within three months he had convinced her to send him more than ??100,000 to save his life. After discovering on April 1 that she was the victim of an online scam, Rachel realised she had lost her life savings and was tens of thousands of pounds in debt. SEE CATERS COPY
The scammers sent photos and documents to bolster their story (this one has been blurred for legal reasons) (Picture: Caters News Agency)

Ms Elwell does not dispute that she authorised the payments and knows ‘this is my mistake’, but ‘just wants to be treated fairly’ and given the support she says she is entitled to.

She added: ‘Creditors have said this is one of the worst cases of online fraud they have ever seen.

‘Romance fraud is serious organised crime and they are sophisticated and very manipulative criminals.’

A spokesperson for Santander said: ‘We have the utmost sympathy for Ms Elwell and all those who fall victim to the criminals who carry out these scams.

‘Unfortunately, despite repeatedly warning her of the dangers of transferring money to someone she hadn’t met and directly raising our concerns that this was a scam with Ms Elwell and the police, she confirmed she wanted to proceed with the payments.’

A HSBC UK spokesperson said: ‘Protecting customers from fraud is an absolute priority for us and we are sorry to hear that Ms Elwell has been the victim of an authorised push payment scam.

‘We work hard to deliver on our commitments under the CRM Code, helping protect as well as support customers should they fall victim to scammers.

We act with empathy and understanding when investigating a case and we work hard to ensure fair and reasonable outcomes for our customers.

‘Whilst we have an experienced team looking for signs of fraud, customers can also help themselves by taking note of fraud warnings when making payments and following the advice given. 

‘Romance scams are one of the most common types of fraud. Criminals exploit the emotions of their victims to build up a relationship, often via social media or dating sites, and then request money.’

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